November 2019 Newsletter

November 2019


Happy Wednesday!

This month, we have more exciting updates to share.  Tenant Law Group was recently recognized by Law Firm 500 as the 22nd fastest-growing law firm in the United States and the 4th fastest-growing law firm in California.  A few weeks ago, I attend the Law Firm 500 Conference in Las Vegas to accept this award on behalf of our firm.  (Photos here.)  On behalf of the firm, I thank everyone who helped make this award possible: our friends and colleagues, our amazing clients, and most especially our incredible team!

Since our last newsletter, seven new individuals have joined Tenant Law Group.  This includes Law Clerks Yuki Hirai, Mina Arasteh, Rae Hamilton, Joanna Kwong, and Alice Park—all law students at UC Davis School of Law; Client Intake Specialist Victor E. Pérez; and File Clerk La Mya Stern.  La Mya is a freshman at ICA Cristo Rey Academy, a Dominican Catholic college preparatory in San Francisco that empowers girls from underserved communities to become confident young women.  (In 2019, ninety-seven percent of ICA’s graduates were accepted to four-year colleges.)  La Mya is part of ICA’s work-study program, wherein Tenant Law Group is assisting with her tuition in exchange for part-time work.  We are thrilled to be working with La Mya while simultaneously supporting an organization we believe very strongly in.

In this month’s e-newsletter, we discuss security deposits and how you can get yours back.

If you’re interested in joining our growing team, regardless of physical location, visit our website to learn more about available positions.

Thank you for your continued support of Tenant Law Group.  If you or someone you know has been displaced from a rent-controlled apartment without legal justification, harassed by a landlord, or believe his or her rights as a renter have been violated, call us today at (415) 915-7445.  We offer complimentary case evaluations to all prospective clients.

Best Wishes,

Eric L. Toscano

PRACTICE AREAS

Recovering Money in Landlord Disputes

Renter's Rights Counseling

Rent Board Hearings

Eviction Defense

VIDEO OF THE MONTH

IS THERE A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A SECURITY DEPOSIT, A DAMAGE DEPOSIT, AND A PET DEPOSIT?

FROM OUR BLOG

WHAT ARE SECURITY DEPOSITS AND HOW CAN I GET MINE BACK?

When you enter a lease for a rental unit, odds are your landlord will ask you for a security deposit.  While a security deposit may be referred to as a “deposit,” “pet deposit,” or “damage deposit,” the law governing its collection, use, and disposition is the same.

California’s Security Deposit Law

California Civil Code section 1950.5 is the law governing security deposits in California.  A landlord may ask for a maximum of two months’ rent for unfurnished rental units and three months’ rent for furnished rental units.  A landlord may require payment of the first month’s rent separate and apart from the security deposit prior to move-in.

A security deposit may be used “for any purpose,” including but not limited to...

Read more.

The information in this newsletter is the intellectual property of Tenant Law Group, PC. It is for informational and/or educational purposes only and does not constitute legal opinions or advice. The transmission and receipt of information through this newsletter is not intended to establish and will not establish an attorney-client relationship.

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